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Hilbert Vinkenoog

Faroese: A Language on the Edge of the World?

The Faroe Islands can be found rising out of the grey waves of the North Atlantic, situated between Scandinavia, the British Isles and Iceland. The native language spoken on the 17 inhabited islands is Faroese, the second part of the Insular North Germanic duo beside its more famous cousin Icelandic. In this talk Iā€™d like to introduce this unique language to you, and answer a few questions in the process. When did people come to the Faroe Islands and which languages were they speaking? How similar were these developments to those on Iceland, and what effect did smaller immigrant populations speaking Gaelic, Old English and Danish have, and how did Modern Faroese come back from the brink to become the language it is today? And given all this, should we see Faroese as a language on the edge of the world?

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5 Comments

  • heatherjay94 says:

    This is so fascinating! My favourite one yet today ^^ Thank you for this awesome presentation!

  • yokmonster says:

    I was looking for some interesting linguistics projects to pursue and Faroese seems like a great option to consider~ Thank you for this very thorough and fascinating presentation to both the language and the Faroe Islands!

  • Arisu says:

    I’m super impressed, thank you for the thorough presentation!

  • joshapolyglot@gmail.com says:

    fascinating presentation

  • JimmyP says:

    Hello Hilbert
    Very interesting presentation!
    As far as I am concerned, I started to learn Icelandic for its rich history, and we can see that Faroese also has its surprises šŸ™‚
    As a language spoken by few people, what was your experience of learning this language? Have you been learning it speaking with people during your time there? Are Faroese people as protective of their language as Icelanders?
    And once again, thank you for this historical journey throughout medieval languages šŸ™‚

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